Why Phil Jackson Would Be a Better Coach for the Miami Heat Than Pat Riley

It is All About the Zen

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on June 16th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

With respect to current Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, after the Heat loss in the NBA Finals, there are calls in the media for Pat Riley to take back the coaching reins. If Spoelstra is going to be replaced, Riley should stay where he is and he should do whatever it takes to bring in the Zen Master.

For years many critics of Phil Jackson pointed to the fact that he coached great players such as Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant and used that to minimize his accomplishments as a coach and question how good he was. Pat Riley coached a few good players himself in Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, James Worthy, Dwyane Wade and Patrick Ewing and yet Riley seemed to dodge the, “you were successful because of who you coached charge” to the level extolled upon Jackson.

Upon further review we see that whereas none of Jackson’s players won a title prior to his arrival, (talked about in more detail here), it was Riley’s Lakers who had won a championship before he arrived. Further, Riley lost in the playoffs to lower seeds several years in a row as head coach of the Miami Heat, including losing as a number one seed to a number eight, before he quit just before the 2003-4 season.

If a superstar player had a stretch that bad in the playoffs the media would suggest that it is and should be an indelible part of the player’s legacy. And so it should be with coach Riley.

However, many in the media have always liked Riley more than Jackson. Further, they conveniently leave out certain facts about the 2006 Miami Heat championship team that Riley coached after the Machiavellian maneuver he employed to replace coach Stan Van Gundy.

Riley lovers such ESPN’s Tony Kornheiser and Skip Bayless have repeatedly stated that Riley brought that Heat team over the top and that Stan Van could not have coached the team to a championship. Lets remember that Van Gundy brought the Heat to the conference finals in 2005.

What Bayless and Kornheiser leave out when they say Riley made the difference between the Heat losing in game seven of the conference finals in 05 and winning in 06 are two key facts.

  • One, Shaq was healthier in 06 than he was in 05. Maybe you can dismiss that one as “The Daddy” was already past his prime and it was D. Wade’s team.
  • Two, Bayless fawns over Wade’s game. Understandable, the man has skills and is clutch. Okay, in that 2005 conference finals, Wade got hurt and missed game 6, and played hobbled in game 7, and they still almost won this series!

When comparing Riley to Van Gundy and who could have done what with which team, don’t you think its fair to bring up those little tidbits? With a healthy Wade (and Shaq) the Heat beat Detroit, without a healthy Wade, the Heat do not win in 2006.

Back to the present. The biggest issue facing today’s Heat is the mind of Lebron James. Clearly he has the talent. Since the end of this year’s finals on Sunday there have been fair comparisons of Lebron to baseball’s Alex Rodriguez and what he went through trying to win a World Series with the New York Yankees.

Further, the calls for Lebron to see a sports psychologist, I think is a good idea. Despite what I said about Riley above, I do think he is a great coach, but he requires players with a thick skin who are on the same page and can withstand and thrive under his intensity. Riley is old school and I don’t think he is the man for the psychological mess Lebron appears to be. Further, James already gets fast break, “showtime” style basketball. It is when the game slows down and is in the half court that he needs help.

Contrary to Riley, the Zen Master, with his books, movies, meditations and alternative approach is what might help heal Lebron off the court and Jackson’s triangle, share and move without the ball offense, might be the thing that redeems him on it.

Jackson has led tormented superstars to the promised land three times. Jordan, Shaq, Kobe, and Kobe a second time after Shaq and Jackson left the Lakers and they fell off the map and failed to make the playoffs. It is a road Jackson has traveled and succeeded on over and over again, more so than Riley.

When they win, Pat still gets the credit for being the executive that brought all the talent together and for having the ego strength to bring in Jackson. For all the unrest in Heat land right now, imagine the instant calm that would ensue if it were announced that Phil Jackson was putting his fishing rod down and taking his Zen to South Beach.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

Time to Update the List of the 50 Greatest Players in the History of the NBA

Would Scottie Pippen Still Make the Cut?

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on June 14th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

In 1996 a panel of players, media and coaches selected the 50 greatest players in the history of the NBA. Fifteen years later would that list be the same? Without question, no.

Scottie Pippen was on the list in 96, a fact we have been reminded of a lot recently when the sports media, in conjunction with Pippen’s bewildering comment that Lebron James could be better than Michael Jordan, brings it to our attention.

According to the original Robin, Scottie Pippen, Jordan was probably the greatest scorer whereas James is an all-around player. Just yesterday a former teammate of Pippen and Jordan, Steve Kerr, weighed in saying that Lebron is more like Scottie than Michael.

Before I get to who would make it to an updated list of the 50 greatest over Pippen, lets remember that Jordan won a defensive player of the year award and made the all-defensive team in ten seasons. And while what we may see over and over again is Jordan’s game winning shot in the NBA Finals against Utah over Bryon Russell, that would not have been possible if Jordan didn’t steal the ball from Karl Malone at the other end of the floor.

Further, while the dynamics of those Bulls teams required Jordan to be a scorer to be successful, Jordan was a great passer as well, and he did find Steve Kerr for a game winner in that Utah finals too.

One thing to keep in mind about assist numbers and totals are that in part they are based as much on finishers as they are on passers. For example, how many assists did Magic Johnson get by lobbing a ball into Kareem Abdul Jabbar (the all time leading scorer and six-time MVP) and watching him make his patented skyhook? Conversely, if Jordan were to lob a ball into Stacey King, Bill Wennington, Luc Longley or an aging Bill Cartwright, (centers that played with Jordan) he was not as likely to get an assist. There, I got that out of my system.

On to the 50 greatest players update. My way of answering this question is to create a fantasy draft where all of the players are 20 years old and I ask myself who would I take if I were starting a team. Who would I want to build around?

Here is a list of those I would take before Pippen who either came into the league after the 50 greatest list was created or whose careers were still in progress: Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan, Dwyane Wade, Lebron James, Dwight Howard, Dirk Nowitzki, Kevin Garnett, Gary Payton, Alonzo Mourning, Carmelo Anthony, Amare Stoudemire, Paul Pierce, Steve Nash, Tony Parker, Manu Ginoboli, Jason Kidd, Chris Paul, Pau Gasol, and Baron Davis — A couple of debatable players are Ray Allen and Pau Gasol… And some young players that could possibly bump Pippen in the future depending on how they continue to play are Derrick Rose, Kevin Durant, Deron Williams, Rajon Rondo, Andrew Bynum, Blake Griffin, Kevin Love, and Russell Westbrook.

Now you can debate some people on or not on this list, and you can debate which players from the 1996 top 50 players would get bumped to accommodate any new additions. I would like to see a panel, similar to the one in 1996, weigh in on and do an update. Sorry Pip, don’t think you’d make it. You’re still great Scottie, but Dude seriously, don’t be dissing Michael.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

Hey Lakers! Give Kareem Abdul-Jabbar a Statue

He is an All Time NBA & Laker Great. What Are You Waiting For?

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on May 19th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

When I first heard retired basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar talking about the slight of not receiving a statue by the Los Angeles Lakers it seemed unseemly to me. A statue is not something you should have to lobby or campaign for. I can’t imagine Gandhi or Martin Luther King Jr. complaining or campaigning for an award. But the truth is, is that many times if you don’t speak up for yourself you will get overlooked, and upon further review if you’re going to be giving out statues then Jabbar is worthy of and should receive one.

Currently there are five statues on display at the Staples Center, with the honor being bestowed to: Magic Johnson, Jerry West, Wayne Gretzky, Oscar De La Hoya, and Chick Hearn.

I can see erecting a statue for West and Magic before Jabbar. Jerry West is the logo for the NBA and post playing days became one of the games best general managers and was instrumental in putting together the talent that lead to more championships for the Lakers.

Magic was and is one the nations most charismatic athletes we have. His business accomplishments in Los Angeles, and his handling of HIV combined with being an all time Laker/NBA great make him a transcendent figure. Further, both played their entire careers with the Lakers and there is something magical about having a great one from the beginning of their career to the end. Alex Rodriguez will never be as much a New York Yankee as Derek Jeter or Don Mattingly.

However, it is the next three getting statue’s without Jabbar getting one that makes me go Hhhmmm (That is all you Arsenio Hall). Similar to what Jabbar has said, it is not that these men don’t deserve the honor but what about Kareem? Lets look at them and compare to Jabbar.

Wayne Gretzky may be the Michael Jordan or Babe Ruth of his sport but he didn’t start his career in Los Angeles and he didn’t end his career there either. He was still a great player with L.A. who did make hockey more relevant in the states, and L.A. in particular, but he was not playing like The Great One of his Edmonton Oilers days. I thought the NHL retiring his number was a great touch, I thought the NBA should have followed suit and done the same with Michael Jordan. But — Hold that thought.

Oscar De La Hoya. The Golden Boy. A great Olympic and boxing champion who was the first boxer to win championship belts in six different weight classes. Further, he was a local hero to many. However, as a boxer the Staples Center was not his home like it was for Jabbar. And — Hold that thought.

There are a handful of legendary announcers that do become a part of their team’s lore and history. They often span many generations and touch the heart of the viewers and their fans. They may drive some people crazy but there is no denying their imprint. Such is the case with Chick Hearn. He was one of a kind. However, outside of L.A., a local icon like Hearn is not as known as an all time great player. The jell-o is still jiggling Chick. Rip, but —

Now lets talk about Jabbar. Even though West and Magic were Laker lifers, Jabbar played as many seasons with the Lakers as West, fourteen. And one more then Magic’s thirteen. By comparison, Gretzky played eight in L.A. and ten in Edmonton. Jabbar played on five championship teams with the Lakers. Gretzky did not win a championship in Los Angeles.

For those late to the party Jabbar is the all-time leader in scoring in the NBA. He scored more points than Michael Jordan and more than twice as many points as Magic. He played on six NBA championship teams (five with the Lakers). He won six MVP’s, three of which were with the Lakers. He won a finals MVP with the Lakers and for extra credit as far as his overall L.A. impact, he played on three NCAA winning teams for UCLA.

In fairness to the Lakers, they do not own the L.A. Kings or the Staples Center so if those entities want to honor Gretzky and De La Hoya that of course is their right. Further, it was apparently the death of Chick Hearn that expedited his statue. Still for a player like Jabbar who is in the argument for top five best player of all time, who accomplished so much as a team and individual in the sport and for the Lakers, who played for so many years alongside Magic Johnson, wouldn’t it have made sense to put up their statues together? Magic, who at the time he retired, as the all-time assist leader in the NBA throwing one last pass to the all time leading scorer? That would have been special indeed.

Outside of Michael Jordan soaring through the air, if ever there was a pose that lent itself to being immortalized in a statue it is the skyhook of Kareem Abul-Jabbar. Chick Hearn didn’t get to live to enjoy the moment of his statue, why wait if it is inevitable for Jabbar?

It wasn’t out there before, so I’m glad you brought it to light number 33. But now the rest is up to Lakers to do it and the media to spotlight it or find out why if they don’t. For the record, without an indication of when, the Lakers are on record as saying they will.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

Barry Bonds, Tim Duncan, Alex Rodriguez, Peyton Manning and the Skip Bayless Double Standard?

Does Bayless Flip Flop on the Criteria He Uses to Judge Who is Best?

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on May 11th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

When asked on ESPN’s First and Ten on May 6th who is the best baseball player of all time Skip Bayless answered Barry Bonds. He discounted Bonds’ alleged steroid use. He sloughed off that Bonds ” — wasn’t that great in the postseason”.

Here is what Skip has had to say about other great athletes:

On Peyton Manning – He calls him the greatest regular season quarterback of all time but eliminates him from the greatest of all time QB discussion because of his postseason performances.

On Tim Duncan – Includes Tim Duncan on his list of top ten greatest basketball players of all time, and the first factor he mentions as to why is because of the four championship rings he won with the San Antonio Spurs.

On Alex Rodriguez – Before Rodriguez wins a World Series with The New York Yankees, Skip dubs A-Rod as A-Fraud, because of his poor playoff performances.

Now follow me Skip:

  • If Peyton Manning has won a Superbowl MVP…
  • If four NBA championships put Duncan in the conversation…
  • If A-Rod was A-Fraud in your eyes before winning a World Series…

Since Barry Bonds did not win a World Series than how is he not a fraud when his postseason numbers are not any better than A-Rod’s in the same sport? Or comparable with Manning’s for his sport? Not to mention how you discount Lebron James in basketball for what you call his lack of clutch gene.

By your own logic and past arguments how can you rate Bonds the best? Further, it is a gross understatement when you say Bonds was not that great in the postseason. Pre what the consensus was for Bonds’ PED use, he was terrible in the playoffs in his Pittsburgh Pirates days, especially when you apply the stringent standards that you do Skip when talking about superstars in any sport.

At best, if you do want to discount PED use (which I wouldn’t) I can see how you would reach the same conclusion with Bonds that you do with Manning and call him the greatest regular season player you ever saw. Because I don’t discount alleged PED years, I would take Ken Griffey Jr. as my best from Bonds’ era.

For all-time greatest? I’m sticking with The Great Bambino, Babe Ruth. Ruth would have probably hit over 900 home runs but he was too busy accumulating more complete games and shut outs than Pedro Martinez.

Look at it this way, when their careers are done I can see a modern-day debate between Albert Pujols and Alex Rodriquez for who is better. Now imagine one of them pitching and winning over 90 games and having a World Series pitching e.r.a. of under one. Who ya got under those circumstances?

What Babe Ruth accomplished would be like Tom Brady intercepting more passes and running back more punt returns for touchdowns than Deion Sanders.

Ruth is in the “who is the greatest discussion” with just his hitting. His pitching ends the debate for me. It’s to prisoner of the moment to say never as far as what we will or won’t see again in terms of an athlete. But the Babe, and a baseball player that dominant as a pitcher and a hitter tops the list of least likely to ever see again.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

Who’s the Batman? Who’s the Robin? Who Cares?

A Better Way for NBA Superstars to Co-exist

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on May 10th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

An annoying trend that has developed in the NBA is whenever two superstars like Lebron James and Dwyane Wade are on the same team the media is in a rush to dub one of them as “The Batman” and the other as “The Robin”. Batman being the main star and Robin the subservient side kick.

Most recently on ESPN’s Pardon The Interruption, MichaelWilbon and TonyKornheiser were talking about this with the two stars on the Oklahoma City Thunder, Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook. With the consensus in the sports world being Westbrook must accept his role as the Robin. So far this is seemingly creating tension and confusion.The problem is, aside from maybe Richard Simmons and the guy who played Gunther on Friends, nobody grows up fantasizing about being Robin. Batman, Superman, or Green Lantern, sure. You want to go Marvel? Spiderman, The Human Torch, maybe Ironman. But not Robin.

To make matters worse, of all the major sports, basketball markets its stars more than any other. In football it’s the Dallas Cowboys against the Washington Redskins. In baseball, it’s the New York Yankees, vs. the Boston Red Sox. In basketball it’s Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers versus Tim Duncan and the San Antonio Spurs.

These young kids coming up want to be the alpha dog. They got the game, they’re making the money, they want top billing and they want to be the man. The game sells the individual and then is surprised when the individual great players don’t buy into the team concept or supporting role. (Which of course they should).

Back in the 80’s when the game began to take off to the next level in terms of viewership and media, nobody was saying Magic Johnson was going to have to be the Robin to Kareem Abul Jabbar’s Batman or vice versa.

When the Philadelphia 76ers acquired Moses Malone no one said okay Julius Erving you’re now being demoted to the Robin.

Scottie Pippen wasn’t asked to be the Joe Dumars or the Robin, as some players are now described as the Scottie Pippin/Robin, with the connotation being the Scottie Pippen/Robin is of lesser stature.

Hyper coverage includes bean counting who takes more shots and making it a daily topic of conversation especially when one player has a bad game and or their team loses. This only adds more unnecessary pressure and tension to the situation.

Supposedly when the New York Knicks acquired Carmelo Anthony he was to be the Batman and Amare Stoudemire the Robin. So spoketh the media. But a funny thing happened in their first playoff game against the Boston Celtics. Stoudemire was on fire in the fourth quarter and when Anthony forced up a shot at the end and missed, even though he is the “Batman”, there were questions of why Robin (Stoudemire) didn’t get the touch.

Forget the dynamic duo, offenses should have a flow that is built game to game based on match-ups, game situations and who is hot. Michael Jordan had no problem passing to Steve Kerr to make the winning shot in an NBA finals game against the Utah Jazz because that is what the situation called for. Mature adults ought to be able to figure it out.

I like what they do in football. For the most part, gone are the days where one running back handles the entire rushing load. Two back sets are fairly standard now but instead of Batman and Robin we get nicknames like Thunder and Lightening, Earth and Wind, and so on.

One running back inevitably gets more carries than the other but there is equality to the nicknames. The running backs know their roles, and they accept and get recognized for them. That is the answer here. Unique cool nicknames for all!

It is also unoriginal to call every duo in the NBA the same name (Batman and Robin). Why not use the player personalities to come up with what they should be called? Magic and Jabbar? I’d call Magic Captain America and Jabbar, Mr. Fantastic. Michael Jordan would be Superman, Scottie Pippen, Spiderman, Dennis Rodman, Wolverine and Phil Jackson? He’d be Dr. Strange. See you can apply it to coaches too!

Diversifying nicknames can be fun for the players and the fans and make it easier for players to embrace their role within the team. And it can be a marketing coup! Are you listening David Stern?

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media

Jeff Chadiha Said What to Jim Rome About Phil Jackson?

The Zen Master Can’t Motivate and Just Rolls the Ball Out?

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on May 8th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

So I’m watching the ESPN show, “Jim Rome is Burning”, and I’m about to doze off when Jeff Chadiha says some of the most ill-informed things about Phil Jackson I have ever heard. How a coach can win a record eleven NBA championships and still be this underrated by some is astonishing.In response to the Los Angeles Lakers being down 0-2 to the Dallas Maverick Chadiha, on Friday, said this, “There in a place that is not very good when you have Phil Jackson as your head coach. Things are falling apart, there are trust issues, there are chemistry issues — He’s not the guy you want on your sideline because he is more of a let the veterans work it out, let my leaders take charge.”

Now down 0-3, odds are the Lakers will lose this series but are you kidding me with this? Lets look at Phil Jackson’s coaching career . When Jackson took over in Chicago, Scottie Pippin was not a veteran and was considered soft. Jackson had to convince Jordan to trust the triangle offense and allegedly there were all kinds of trust and chemistry issues between Jordan and his teammates, as is written in the book, “Jordan Rules”. The Bulls overcame the bad boys in Detroit and won two tittles. Then down 0-2 to the New York Knicks in 1993 they came back to win in six games to make it their first three-peat.

When Jordan retired the first time, it was supposed to be open season on the Bulls. All of the Jackson haters (I’m guessing you too Chadiha?) were salivating about how he and the Bulls were going to be exposed.

Except a funny thing happened on the road to humiliation, they won two fewer games during the regular season than they did the year before with Jordan. They lost in-game seven on a phantom foul call to the New York Knicks in the playoffs.

Had Jackson quit when Jordan retired and someone else came in and led the Bulls to that identical season you can bet that coach would have won coach of the year and we would have heard how impressive that was.

The Bulls second three-peat: If Jordan’s first year back after retirement was his true rookie year he would not have gone down as arguably the greatest of all-time. He still would be great but his athleticism was clearly diminished. Jackson coached a new cast of characters to another three-peat. He tamed Dennis Rodman (enough) and kept his team focused to win a regular season record-breaking 72 games.

Back to the Rome/ Chadiha interview — When Jim Rome says to Chadiha, “I thought the guy (Jackson) was a brilliant motivator — ” Chadiha looks at Rome as if to say “Child please” and responds with, “He’s a front-runner — ”

Jackson’s third three-peat: Now with the Los Angeles Lakers. Now with Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal. The year before Jackson’s arrival, the Lakers got swept out of the playoffs by San Antonio. The year before that they got swept out of the playoffs by Utah. Kobe was not yet the superstar he thought he was but would later become. The historic soap opera and battle for alpha dog supremacy between Shaq and Bryant was underway and threatening to break up the dynasty before it had a chance to begin.

It is safe to say there was trust and chemistry issues galore Mr. Chadiha. Issues that would have split up the team if not for the Zen Master leading them to a championship in his first season. PJ motivated Shaq to play defense like we had never seen him play it before and got Kobe to defer to Shaq.

Continuing with Rome when he asks Chadiha, “What are you saying that he just rolls the ball out?” Chadiha’s response, “Basically, yeah that is what he does — but when it comes to motivating people when times are down he is not your guy.”

After a year out of coaching, PJ returns to the Lakers who are now a team in a state of flux. Shaq is gone and the Lakers did not make the playoffs in Jackson’s absence. Not exactly a front running situation.

Despite writing a tell all book that hung Kobe out to dry, Bryant welcomed Phil back with open arms because he knew the dude could coach! This team clearly had work to do and similar to the salivation the Jackson haters had after Jordan retired that first time, people were lining up to see Jackson fail.

This time winning didn’t come right away. On the journey back to winning championships Jackson would have to:

  • Integrate a rookie out of high school named Andrew Bynum.
  • He would have to repair trust issues and build Bynum up after a camera/cell phone caught Kobe Bryant in public complaining that the Lakers didn’t trade Bynum for Jason Kidd.
  • Jackson had to integrate foreign plays such as Sasha Vujacic, and Vladamir Radmanovic.

Further, there was another rookie named Trevor Ariza, the acquisition of Pau Gasol and he had to get key veteran Lamar Odom to accept losing his starting role to come off the bench.

For money reasons, budding star Ariza was let go and the enigmatic Ron Artest was brought in. No matter, Jackson coached them to another championship with both players.

If you look at the state of Jackson’s teams before and after he arrived and the fact that they never won a championship or even made it to an NBA finals without him, his contributions should be unquestioned.

The loyalty he inspires from stars and role players alike provide further testimony to things like chemistry, trust and motivation. The man has more championships as a head coach then Pat Riley, Gregg Popovich, Doc Rivers, George Karl, Jeff Van Gundy, Stan Van Gundy, Jerry Sloan, and Don Nelson combined.

Pat Riley took over a Laker team that already won a championship. Gregg Popovich had a dynasty in San Antonio but never was able to repeat or make it back to the championship the following season. Doc Rivers coaching record prior to Danny Ainge making a great trade for Ray Allen, being gifted Garnett from his friend in Minnesota Kevin McHale, drafting Rajon Rondo and adding all of this to Paul Pierce, was average at best, Jerry Sloan, never won with Stockton and Malone.

Lets face it Jeff, for whatever reason, Jackson could never satisfy the haters. Had he won with Stockton and Malone, or the current big three (really four) in Boston, or back when Seattle had Gary Payton and Shawn Kemp, the Ewing led Knicks, Dwight Howard in Orlando — You would always write off his winning and attribute it to the talent. Well guess what, it does take talent to win in the NBA yo.

But prior to Michael Jordan only once in the history of the NBA had a team with the leading scorer won a championship. Jackson motivates, he gets the most out of his players and just because he doesn’t call time outs when he is supposed to doesn’t mean he is not coaching.

Criticizing Jackson after an epic record-setting run of 11 championships and for not coming back from 0-2 after losing the first two at home (something only done three times) would be like criticizing Joe DiMaggio after game fifty-seven when his hitting streak ended.

PS And just for good measure, Jackson won a championship in the Continental Basketball Association back in 1984. I guess he must have had the Michael Jordan of the CBA on his team and just rolled out the ball for him too.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in-depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

STOP “The What If Kendrick Perkins Didn’t Get Hurt”

Have You Heard of Andrew Bynum?

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on April 24th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

For the last year I have had to listen and read about how the Boston Celtics would have won the 2010 NBA Championship if Kendrick Perkins did not get hurt in game seven of last year’s finals against the Los Angeles Lakers.

It has been stated so much it has become accepted wisdom. Today’s column by Mike Lupica in the New York Daily News* is the last draw. Enough!

This is a perfect example of the media relaying selective facts to further their opinion or point of view. Yes, Kendrick Perkins got injured in game six of the finals last year and didn’t play in game seven.

However, Andrew Bynum played the entire series injured and basically on one leg. His minutes and productivity clearly down. It can be equally if not argued more accurately that if Bynum was not playing so injured the Lakers would have won the series before it got to a game seven. But in all of the sports shows and media articles I have read about the loss of Perkins in game seven I have never heard or read that counterpoint. (Apologies to anyone out there who stated it.)

Let’s take it one step further as Doc Rivers himself has added to the legend of this story by lamenting many times that his starting five of Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Rajon, Rondo and Kendrick Perkins never lost a playoff series when healthy. When the Celtics beat the Lakers in the 2008 finals, Andrew Bynum was injured not just for one game but the entire series, as was Trevor Ariza. These were two key members of the Lakers 2009 championship.

So instead of talking about the Celtics beating the Lakers had Perkins not missed one game in 2010, isn’t time we discuss how the Lakers would have beat the Celtics if Bynum and Ariza played in 2008? How bout we let both situations go and accept that the Celtics were the worthy champion in 2008 and the Lakers the worthy champion in 2010 and put the kibosh on what I will refer to as the “Perkins asterisk”.

#####

*The main point of Lupica’s article today was to pine for Doc Rivers to be the Knicks next coach. Because as we know, even with Chauncey Billups hurt, Amare Stoudemire hurt and the nucleus of the team being together less then half a season Doc would have the Knicks sweeping teams on their way to a championship this year.

Look, I liked Doc Rivers as a player and even more as an announcer. Further, he is doing a great job coaching in Boston now, but he is not the messiah because he coached three hall of famers and four all-stars to one NBA title.

Let’s not forget that Doc was fired from Orlando in 2003 after his team got off to a 1 -10 start and overall he finished his tenure with the Magic two games above five hundred.

Let’s not forget that his Celtics struggled against lesser teams on their way to that one championship.  And in the season prior to the major influx of talent his Celtics were 24 -58. I believe it was the logo himself, Jerry West, who recently reminded us that talent wins.

As I’ve written in previous blogs, Mike D’Antoni deserves more time. If it doesn’t work out in the near future and a coaching vacancy arises, Doc would certainly be a very worthy candidate, especially if the Knicks are a team of stars needing to get the next level. No offense to Doc, I’m happy for his success in Boston but I’m rooting for Mike D. to do the same in New York.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…

The NBA Has Every Right to Have an Age Requirement

Smacking Down ESPN’s First and Ten‘s Skip Bayless and Chris Broussard

(This blog was originally posted on the Yahoo Contributor Network on April 7th, 2011. As of 7/31/14 YCN has taken down all of its content)

March Madness is recently behind us and the NFL isn’t the only league with an expiring collective bargaining agreement .

As the NBA CBA is set to expire, one of the issues the players want to put on the table is the requirement that kids out of high school play one year of college basketball before gaining eligibility into the NBA. The players don’t like it. Many in the media don’t like it. On ESPN’s First and Ten, NBA analyst Chris Broussard made the point if they’re good enough they should get to play out of high school as athletes from other sports can. On the same show, Skip Bayless referred to the rule as being unconstitutional.

Those arguments are as ludicrous and as out of touch with society as the media claims athletes can be.Chris Broussard, you’re up first: If I understand you correctly, because business A, B, and C chooses to do business a certain way, every other business has to do business the same way? Does Hockey treat violence in the sport the same as the NBA? No. Does the NFL treat excessive celebration the same as Soccer? Are the rules of your workplace identical to that of everyone you know or are there differences based on the needs of individual companies?

Let’s look at why the NBA instituted the rule in the first place. Athletes out of high school generally fit into one of the following categories:

  • Bust.
  • Future star.
  • Future contributor/role player.
  • Drop out due to personal problems and or lack of ability.

 

So there are more ways that drafting an eighteen year old can harm you or cost you than help you. Further, there is the belief that a year or more of basketball at the collegiate level will make for a better work force later.

One could retort, that players with college experience fall into the same categories. However, all risks are heightened when you allow eighteen an year-old, whose body generally is not fully developed, and whose mind is generally not as mature, to compete with men.

Contrary to your point Chris, many times these high school players are not good enough; they are drafted for their future potential and are educated on the team’s dime. They have skills but lack fundamentals, and if the league wants to protect themselves from themselves and require a year of college experience before eligibility they have the right to try and minimize their risk and do so.

It is not the NBA’s responsibility to factor into the equation the needs of potential future employees beyond how they can help their league. That is not meant to sound cold, it is a reflection of how it is for other business’ in America, and to point out that the NBA is not acting in a dastardly or unconstitutional way (Really Skip? Really??). The fact that other sports let younger athletes compete professionally does not mitigate the NBA’s position.

Another argument Broussard made is even if the high school player doesn’t go on to be a star, he still makes a living. He used Kwame Brown, the former number one draft pick of Michael Jordan’s Washington Wizards as an example. That’s great for Kwame Brown, but the Wizards didn’t draft him with the number one pick in the draft and pay him first draft pick money so that he could be a serviceable player. Yes there will always be busts even if they go to college, but if the NBA thinks they can reduce the odds of that, right or wrong, that is their right. Maybe with a year or two of college Brown would have been more ready for the NBA and had a better career.

Skip, you’re up. You make a lot of good points on the show and can be very creative in making your presentations, however leave the legal arguments to Erik Kuselias.  You have clearly never taken a law class if you can point to this rule as being unconstitutional. On exactly which constitutional amendment is your argument based on?

Skip is it unconstitutional for a business to require someone to have a four-year degree to get a job? One of my first jobs was working in a group home for abused adolescents kids. The job required a college degree. Not a year or two in psychology, but a four-year degree with all the classes that have nothing to do with working with kids. Having done the job, I can say I could have performed my duties without the degree just fine, as could other co-workers. But then there were those that maybe they could not have. Either way, it was the companies right to have that policy.

And while we’re on the subject of law, does the name Maurice Clarett and his failed attempt to sue his way through the NFL rule that make you wait three years after high school before you can join the NFL ring any bells? Funny Chris, you didn’t mention the NFL as a sport that makes you wait longer than the NBA.

If Skip and the rest of the those against the NBA for doing this would read something other than the sports section of a newspaper or website they would realize that many jobs in the public and private sector have something called eligibility requirements that they implement because they believe it is in the best interest of their company’s success and or their consumers. I must credit Jemele Hill, who on a later episode of First and Ten, did allude to private sector rights.

Look, I don’t blame high school athletes for wanting to play out of high school.  If I had Lebron James, Koby Bryant’s, or even Kwame Brown’s ability, I think I would have made the same decision. I firmly believe that college athletes, in huge revenue generating sports such as football and basketball should be getting paid, but the unfairness of the college game does not negate the rights of the NBA to implement objective rules that it feels are in its best interest.

It is curious that the player’s union would be interested in repealing this rule as it could adversely affect older players and take jobs away from them. Personally I like the rule and if college players could make money, I’d like to see the rule bumped up to two years. This would eliminate the one and done mentality and help these young men really get the most out of the college game, better prepare them for the NBA, and have them ready to contribute right away. It would benefit the college and pro-game. Jordan, Bird, Magic, all played at least two years in college. I think the players and the media can survive if today’s greats do the same.

Published by Jeff Schubert

Jeff Schubert is the Host/Executive Producer of the show Filmnut that airs on thestream.tv. Each webisode provides an in depth interview about the making, marketing, or distribution of film, TV or new media…